Violent Crime in Chicago – What to do?

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Have you been accused of a violent crime in Chicago or Chicagoland’s suburbs? Quintana Law Group takes your violent crime charges very seriously and will make sure you’re provided the proper defense.

There is a long list of legal violations in the State of Illinois that are classified as “violent.” If you’ve been accused of one of these violent Crimes in Chicago or anywhere else in Illinois you must contact Quintana Law Group immediately.

The list below covers some, but not all, violent crimes in Illinois:

Aggravated battery

– Battery is a criminal offense involving the unlawful physical acting upon a threat, distinct from assault which is the act of creating apprehension of such contact.

Armed robbery

– Robbery is the crime of taking or attempting to take anything of value by force, threat of force, or by putting the victim in fear. According to common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear; that is, it is a larceny or theft accomplished by an assault.

Arson

– Arson is a crime of intentionally, deliberately and maliciously setting fire to buildings, wildland areas, abandoned homes, vehicles or other property with the intent to cause damage or enjoy the act.

Battery

(including domestic)- Physical abuse is that involving contact intended to cause fear, pain, injury, other physical suffering or bodily harm.

Child abuse and endangerment

– Child abuse or child maltreatment is physical, sexual, or psychological maltreatment or neglect of a child or children, especially by a parent or other caregiver. Child abuse may include any act or failure to act by a parent or other caregiver that results in actual or potential harm to a child, and can occur in a child’s home, or in the organizations, schools or communities the child interacts with.

Homicide

– Homicide is the act of one human killing another. A homicide requires only a volitional act by another person that results in death, and thus a homicide may result from accidental, reckless, or negligent acts even if there is no intent to cause harm. Homicides can be divided into many overlapping legal categories, including murder, manslaughter, justifiable homicide, and more.

Kidnapping

– kidnapping is the unlawful carrying away (asportation) and confinement of a person against his will. Thus, it is a composite crime. It can also be defined as false imprisonment by means of abduction, both of which are separate crimes that when committed simultaneously upon the same person merge as the single crime of kidnapping. The asportation/abduction element is typically but not necessarily conducted by means of force or fear. That is, the perpetrator may use a weapon to force the victim into a vehicle, but it is still kidnapping if the victim is enticed to enter the vehicle willingly, e.g., in the belief it is a taxicab. Kidnapping may be done to demand for ransom in exchange for releasing the victim, or for other illegal purposes. Kidnapping can be accompanied by bodily injury which elevates the crime to aggravated kidnapping.

Rape

– Rape is a type of sexual assault usually involving sexual intercourse or other forms of sexual penetration carried out against a person without that person’s consent.

Robbery

– Robbery is the crime of taking or attempting to take anything of value by force, threat of force, or by putting the victim in fear. According to common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear; that is, it is a larceny or theft accomplished by an assault.

Weapons offenses

– Some examples of weapons crimes in Illinois include Selling, manufacturing, purchasing, or possessing a bludgeon, black-jack, slug shot, sand-club, sand-bag, brass knuckles, throwing star, or switchblade. Also, carrying or possessing a dagger, billy, dirk, switchblade, razor, stiletto, broken bottle, stun gun or taser, or any other similarly dangerous or deadly weapon with the intent of using it unlawfully against another person.

So what should you do if you’re accused of a violent crime? First, remember you have the right to remain silent. Second, anything that you say can and will be used against in court. Third and most important rule is to “lawyer up.” Talking to police can damage your case immensely. This is the time to contact your attorney at Quintana Law Group.

Guilty or innocent, a lot of people make the mistake believing that asking for a lawyer makes them look guilty but the police already think you’re guilty or you wouldn’t be under arrest. Quintana Law Group’s job is to make sure that you’re treated fairly under the law and that you have not been a victim of a constitutional violation of your rights.

Contact Quintana Law Group today for a free consultation regarding your violent crime defense with one of Chicagoland’s most trusted attorneys.

Phone: 312-233-8313

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